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HOU (G, PG, SG)
G
75
Min
36.3
PTS
32.5
REB
6.6
AST
8.3
STL
2.0
BLK
0.7
3PT
4.1
The runner up for the 2018-19 Most Valuable Player award, Harden put together another dominant offensive campaign. En route to his sixth All-NBA selection, Harden averaged a league-high 36.1 points to go along with 7.5 assists, 6.6 rebounds and 2.0 steals. He also led the NBA in made threes (378) and free-throws (754), becoming the first player in NBA history to rack up at least 300 threes and 700 free-throws. Unsurprisingly, Harden's 40.5% usage rate ranked No. 1 as well, and it ranked second all-time behind only Russell Westbrook's 2016-17 campaign (41.7%). Ironically, those two are now teammates, as the Rockets traded Chris Paul to the Thunder to acquire Westbrook over the summer in what could end up being the highest-usage backcourt of all-time. While the pair figure to see as little time on the court together as realistically possible (considering that was the case with Harden and Paul), there will be some overlap. How much that overlap will impact Harden's stats is tough to gauge, but it seems likely that Westbrook will sacrifice more, as he's the one joining Harden's offense. Fantasy owners have a right to downgrade Harden slightly with Westbrook coming to town, but he's still worthy of being selected No. 1 overall in the vast majority of fantasy formats.
The runner up for the 2018-19 Most Valuable Player award, Harden put together another dominant offensive campaign. En route to his sixth All-NBA selection, Harden averaged a league-high 36.1 points to go along with 7.5 assists, 6.6 rebounds and 2.0 steals. He also led the NBA in made threes (378) and free-throws (754), becoming the first player in NBA history to rack up at least 300 threes and 700 free-throws. Unsurprisingly, Harden's 40.5% usage rate ranked No. 1 as well, and it ranked second all-time behind only Russell Westbrook's 2016-17 campaign (41.7%). Ironically, those two are now teammates, as the Rockets traded Chris Paul to the Thunder to acquire Westbrook over the summer in what could end up being the highest-usage backcourt of all-time. While the pair figure to see as little time on the court together as realistically possible (considering that was the case with Harden and Paul), there will be some overlap. How much that overlap will impact Harden's stats is tough to gauge, but it seems likely that Westbrook will sacrifice more, as he's the one joining Harden's offense. Fantasy owners have a right to downgrade Harden slightly with Westbrook coming to town, but he's still worthy of being selected No. 1 overall in the vast majority of fantasy formats.
MIL (F, SF, PF)
G
74
Min
33.3
PTS
29.5
REB
12.7
AST
6.0
STL
1.3
BLK
1.6
3PT
1.1
Winner of the 2018-19 Most Valuable Player award, Antetokounmpo has firmly established himself among the truly elite talent in the NBA. In Mike Budenholzer's first year as head coach, the Bucks' offense and defense underwent massive transformation, and Antetokounmpo was able to thrive like never before. As one of the most well-rounded players in the league, Antetokounmpo became just the fifth player in the three-point era to average at least 25 points, 10 rebounds and five assists in a single season -- the others being Charles Barkley, Larry Bird, Russell Westbrook (twice) and DeMarcus Cousins. And of those players' seasons, Antetokounmpo had the highest true shooting percentage (64.4%). Plus, he's averaging a combined 3.1 blocks/steals over the past three seasons and has been named to an All-Defensive team twice. While he may never be a great shooter, Antetokounmpo's one-of-a-kind athleticism makes him arguably the league's most dominant inside scorer, with 643 of his 721 made field-goals coming at the rim. Heading into 2019-20, it's hard to imagine The Greek Freak getting much better, but he's just 24 years old. It's without question that he's one of the few players worthy of being selected with the No. 1 overall pick in fantasy drafts.
Winner of the 2018-19 Most Valuable Player award, Antetokounmpo has firmly established himself among the truly elite talent in the NBA. In Mike Budenholzer's first year as head coach, the Bucks' offense and defense underwent massive transformation, and Antetokounmpo was able to thrive like never before. As one of the most well-rounded players in the league, Antetokounmpo became just the fifth player in the three-point era to average at least 25 points, 10 rebounds and five assists in a single season -- the others being Charles Barkley, Larry Bird, Russell Westbrook (twice) and DeMarcus Cousins. And of those players' seasons, Antetokounmpo had the highest true shooting percentage (64.4%). Plus, he's averaging a combined 3.1 blocks/steals over the past three seasons and has been named to an All-Defensive team twice. While he may never be a great shooter, Antetokounmpo's one-of-a-kind athleticism makes him arguably the league's most dominant inside scorer, with 643 of his 721 made field-goals coming at the rim. Heading into 2019-20, it's hard to imagine The Greek Freak getting much better, but he's just 24 years old. It's without question that he's one of the few players worthy of being selected with the No. 1 overall pick in fantasy drafts.
LAL (C, C, PF)
G
74
Min
35.8
PTS
27.7
REB
12.7
AST
3.6
STL
1.5
BLK
2.7
3PT
1.1
Davis was limited to 56 games during the 2018-19 campaign, largely due to a mid-season public trade request (that was not granted until the offseason). Once the trade deadline passed and Davis was still a member of the Pelicans, he saw his workload reduced substantially. The Brow never played more than 24 minutes after Feb. 9, and he appeared in just 13 of the final 25 games of the season. But it's most important to look at how he performed before things reached a breaking point. Through his first 41 appearances of the season, Davis averaged 29.3 points, 13.3 rebounds, 4.4 assists and a combined 4.3 blocks/steals. Had he sustained those numbers across the entire year, Davis would have become just the second player in NBA history to average at least 29 points, 13 rebounds, 4 assists and 2 blocks -- the other being Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. With the Lakers trading for Davis in the offseason, he instantly becomes the best teammate LeBron James has ever had, and the combination figures to be one of the deadliest in the NBA. While playing next to LeBron could reduce Davis' usage, there's a possibility that it will free up his game in different ways. Increased attention on LeBron could result in increased efficiency for Davis, and considering LeBron is the best passer Davis has ever played with, the big man could be in line for some easy buckets off pick-and-rolls. Ultimately, Davis should continue producing at an MVP-caliber level.
Davis was limited to 56 games during the 2018-19 campaign, largely due to a mid-season public trade request (that was not granted until the offseason). Once the trade deadline passed and Davis was still a member of the Pelicans, he saw his workload reduced substantially. The Brow never played more than 24 minutes after Feb. 9, and he appeared in just 13 of the final 25 games of the season. But it's most important to look at how he performed before things reached a breaking point. Through his first 41 appearances of the season, Davis averaged 29.3 points, 13.3 rebounds, 4.4 assists and a combined 4.3 blocks/steals. Had he sustained those numbers across the entire year, Davis would have become just the second player in NBA history to average at least 29 points, 13 rebounds, 4 assists and 2 blocks -- the other being Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. With the Lakers trading for Davis in the offseason, he instantly becomes the best teammate LeBron James has ever had, and the combination figures to be one of the deadliest in the NBA. While playing next to LeBron could reduce Davis' usage, there's a possibility that it will free up his game in different ways. Increased attention on LeBron could result in increased efficiency for Davis, and considering LeBron is the best passer Davis has ever played with, the big man could be in line for some easy buckets off pick-and-rolls. Ultimately, Davis should continue producing at an MVP-caliber level.
MIN (C, C)
G
81
Min
34.7
PTS
26.8
REB
12.9
AST
3.6
STL
0.9
BLK
1.7
3PT
2.1
Set to turn 24 years old in 2019-20, Towns is coming off two straight All-Star appearances. Over the past two seasons, he's averaged 22.8 points, 12.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.5 blocks. Maybe most impressive is his efficiency, with Towns shooting 53.1 percent from the field, 40.9 percent from deep and 84.6 percent from the free-throw line as an All-Star. While his production hasn't translated into wins for the Timberwolves, he's undoubtedly one of the best big men in the league on the offensive side of the ball, capable of scoring from anywhere on the court. In 2018-19, he registered 20 performances with at least 30 points, not to mention three 40-point efforts. Minnesota didn't add any high-usage players during the offseason, so Towns' role should be secure. Health is also valuable in fantasy, and Towns has been excellent at staying on the court. He didn't miss a game through his first three seasons, and while he played 77 games last year, he only missed time due to a car accident. Despite not being an All-NBA player, there's plenty of justification for Towns to be the first center off the board in fantasy drafts.
Set to turn 24 years old in 2019-20, Towns is coming off two straight All-Star appearances. Over the past two seasons, he's averaged 22.8 points, 12.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.5 blocks. Maybe most impressive is his efficiency, with Towns shooting 53.1 percent from the field, 40.9 percent from deep and 84.6 percent from the free-throw line as an All-Star. While his production hasn't translated into wins for the Timberwolves, he's undoubtedly one of the best big men in the league on the offensive side of the ball, capable of scoring from anywhere on the court. In 2018-19, he registered 20 performances with at least 30 points, not to mention three 40-point efforts. Minnesota didn't add any high-usage players during the offseason, so Towns' role should be secure. Health is also valuable in fantasy, and Towns has been excellent at staying on the court. He didn't miss a game through his first three seasons, and while he played 77 games last year, he only missed time due to a car accident. Despite not being an All-NBA player, there's plenty of justification for Towns to be the first center off the board in fantasy drafts.
LAL (F, SF, PF, PG)
G
72
Min
36.2
PTS
26.2
REB
8.0
AST
9.2
STL
1.3
BLK
0.6
3PT
2.1
After 15 years of being one of the most consistently durable superstars in NBA history, James finally showed signs of wear in 2018-19. The 34-year-old missed a career-high 27 games -- most of which were due to a groin strain suffered on Christmas Day. While James was able to return before the end of January, it was too late to save the floundering Lakers, who struggled to a 6-12 record in his absence, falling out of playoff contention in the process. Back for Year 17 with renewed focus, and a revamped supporting cast headlined by Anthony Davis, James will seek to prove he's still arguably the best player in the NBA. When James was on the floor last season, his production -- 27.4 points, 8.5 rebounds, 8.3 assists, 1.3 steals, 51% FG -- spoke for itself. But he'll need to stay healthy, and engaged, for the Lakers to reach their ceiling as one of several title contenders out West. The same goes for James' fantasy value, which remains elite but has tailed off slightly in recent years. The four-time MVP should be among the league leaders in counting stats once again this season, but he's taken a noticeable step back on the defensive end, while his free throw shooting reached new depths (66.5% FT) a year ago. Outside shooting is also somewhat of a concern for James, who's proven to be a dependable threat from downtown over the course of his career but hit less than 34 percent of his 5.9 three-point attempts per game last season. The addition of Davis should help breathe new life into James, and reports that he may end up serving as the Lakers' starting point guard will only boost his already-gaudy assists numbers. Overall, assuming he can stay healthy, James is an elite fantasy commodity who warrants first-round consideration in many leagues.
After 15 years of being one of the most consistently durable superstars in NBA history, James finally showed signs of wear in 2018-19. The 34-year-old missed a career-high 27 games -- most of which were due to a groin strain suffered on Christmas Day. While James was able to return before the end of January, it was too late to save the floundering Lakers, who struggled to a 6-12 record in his absence, falling out of playoff contention in the process. Back for Year 17 with renewed focus, and a revamped supporting cast headlined by Anthony Davis, James will seek to prove he's still arguably the best player in the NBA. When James was on the floor last season, his production -- 27.4 points, 8.5 rebounds, 8.3 assists, 1.3 steals, 51% FG -- spoke for itself. But he'll need to stay healthy, and engaged, for the Lakers to reach their ceiling as one of several title contenders out West. The same goes for James' fantasy value, which remains elite but has tailed off slightly in recent years. The four-time MVP should be among the league leaders in counting stats once again this season, but he's taken a noticeable step back on the defensive end, while his free throw shooting reached new depths (66.5% FT) a year ago. Outside shooting is also somewhat of a concern for James, who's proven to be a dependable threat from downtown over the course of his career but hit less than 34 percent of his 5.9 three-point attempts per game last season. The addition of Davis should help breathe new life into James, and reports that he may end up serving as the Lakers' starting point guard will only boost his already-gaudy assists numbers. Overall, assuming he can stay healthy, James is an elite fantasy commodity who warrants first-round consideration in many leagues.
HOU (G, PG)
G
78
Min
34.3
PTS
21.8
REB
7.7
AST
8.0
STL
1.7
BLK
0.4
3PT
2.0
The 2016-17 Most Valuable Player and an eight-time All-NBA selection, Westbrook will begin his first season with a new franchise in 2019-20. He had been a member of the Thunder organization since being drafted fourth overall in 2008, but he was traded to the Rockets over the summer in exchange for, mainly, Chris Paul. Westbrook's bloated contract was thought by some to be untradable, but Houston was willing to take the chance to pair him with James Harden, another former MVP. With both players being so ball-dominant -- Harden's 40.5% usage in 2018-19 ranking No. 1 and Westbrook's 30.9% usage ranking No. 10 -- it's right for fantasy owners to wonder how the situation will affect Westbrook's role and statistics. As was the case with Paul, coach Mike D'Antoni will likely stagger Westbrook and Harden as much as possible, so it would be surprising if Westbrook saw a massive drop in numbers. The main concern with Westbrook will continue to be his shooting percentages. Westbrook is one of only two guards in the three-point era to take at least 20 shots per game while shooting worse than 45 percent from the field and 70 percent from the free-throw line in a single season -- the other being Baron Davis in 2003-04. Efficiency aside, Westbrook's raw numbers continue to fuel his fantasy value. He's averaged a triple-double for the past three seasons -- a streak Westbrook will likely try to continue for as long as possible.
The 2016-17 Most Valuable Player and an eight-time All-NBA selection, Westbrook will begin his first season with a new franchise in 2019-20. He had been a member of the Thunder organization since being drafted fourth overall in 2008, but he was traded to the Rockets over the summer in exchange for, mainly, Chris Paul. Westbrook's bloated contract was thought by some to be untradable, but Houston was willing to take the chance to pair him with James Harden, another former MVP. With both players being so ball-dominant -- Harden's 40.5% usage in 2018-19 ranking No. 1 and Westbrook's 30.9% usage ranking No. 10 -- it's right for fantasy owners to wonder how the situation will affect Westbrook's role and statistics. As was the case with Paul, coach Mike D'Antoni will likely stagger Westbrook and Harden as much as possible, so it would be surprising if Westbrook saw a massive drop in numbers. The main concern with Westbrook will continue to be his shooting percentages. Westbrook is one of only two guards in the three-point era to take at least 20 shots per game while shooting worse than 45 percent from the field and 70 percent from the free-throw line in a single season -- the other being Baron Davis in 2003-04. Efficiency aside, Westbrook's raw numbers continue to fuel his fantasy value. He's averaged a triple-double for the past three seasons -- a streak Westbrook will likely try to continue for as long as possible.
GS (G, SG, PG)
G
70
Min
34.2
PTS
29.6
REB
5.4
AST
6.3
STL
1.4
BLK
0.2
3PT
5.1
Curry is coming off of his sixth All-NBA selection, and he continues to assert himself as one of the best shooters of all time. Averaging 27.3 points in 2018-19, Curry drilled 5.1 threes per game at 43.7 percent, also making 47.2 percent of his field goals overall and converting 91.6 percent of his free throws. The sure-fire Hall-of-Famer also racked up 5.3 rebounds, 5.2 assists and 1.3 steals per contest. This season is especially interesting, as it's possible Curry will see his usage increase with the departure of Kevin Durant. The year prior to Durant's arrival (2015-16), Curry collected his second straight MVP award by averaging 30.1 points, 6.7 assists, 5.4 rebounds and 2.1 steals. But that's when Curry was 27 years old, and he'll now be 31. While he's had some injury concerns across the past two seasons, appearing in just 120 games, Curry remains among the elite fantasy assets when healthy and is worthy of a top-5 selection in almost all formats.
Curry is coming off of his sixth All-NBA selection, and he continues to assert himself as one of the best shooters of all time. Averaging 27.3 points in 2018-19, Curry drilled 5.1 threes per game at 43.7 percent, also making 47.2 percent of his field goals overall and converting 91.6 percent of his free throws. The sure-fire Hall-of-Famer also racked up 5.3 rebounds, 5.2 assists and 1.3 steals per contest. This season is especially interesting, as it's possible Curry will see his usage increase with the departure of Kevin Durant. The year prior to Durant's arrival (2015-16), Curry collected his second straight MVP award by averaging 30.1 points, 6.7 assists, 5.4 rebounds and 2.1 steals. But that's when Curry was 27 years old, and he'll now be 31. While he's had some injury concerns across the past two seasons, appearing in just 120 games, Curry remains among the elite fantasy assets when healthy and is worthy of a top-5 selection in almost all formats.
WAS (G, PG, SG)
G
80
Min
36.1
PTS
26.3
REB
4.9
AST
5.3
STL
1.3
BLK
0.7
3PT
2.9
Beal is coming off his second straight All-Star appearance, and he led the NBA in total minutes (3,028) during the 2018-19 season. While looking at his per-game numbers for the year shows improvement, much of the progress occurred after John Wall was lost for the year due to injury. Wall played his last game on Dec. 26, and Beal took over as the Wizards' primary ballhandler after that point. From Dec. 28 onward, Beal averaged 27.2 points, 6.0 assists, 5.1 rebounds and 1.8 steals. Had he posted those numbers across the entire campaign, Beal would have been one of only two players to average at least 25 points, 5 rebounds, 5 assists and 1.5 steals last year -- the other being James Harden. With Washington not bringing in any other high-usage players during the offseason and Wall out for all of 2019-20, it seems reasonable to expect Beal to continue working within the expanded role he took on last season. Assuming that's the case, Beal profiles as a late-first or early-second round draft pick in most fantasy formats.
Beal is coming off his second straight All-Star appearance, and he led the NBA in total minutes (3,028) during the 2018-19 season. While looking at his per-game numbers for the year shows improvement, much of the progress occurred after John Wall was lost for the year due to injury. Wall played his last game on Dec. 26, and Beal took over as the Wizards' primary ballhandler after that point. From Dec. 28 onward, Beal averaged 27.2 points, 6.0 assists, 5.1 rebounds and 1.8 steals. Had he posted those numbers across the entire campaign, Beal would have been one of only two players to average at least 25 points, 5 rebounds, 5 assists and 1.5 steals last year -- the other being James Harden. With Washington not bringing in any other high-usage players during the offseason and Wall out for all of 2019-20, it seems reasonable to expect Beal to continue working within the expanded role he took on last season. Assuming that's the case, Beal profiles as a late-first or early-second round draft pick in most fantasy formats.
POR (G, PG)
G
76
Min
36.2
PTS
27.1
REB
4.7
AST
7.0
STL
1.1
BLK
0.4
3PT
3.2
Lillard is coming off his fourth All-NBA selection, and he posted career highs in field-goal percentage (44.4) and assists per game (6.9). Lillard has been a driving force of Portland's offense essentially since his rookie year, but things really took off once LaMarcus Aldridge left the team ahead of the 2015-16 campaign. Since then, Lillard has averaged 26.2 points, 6.5 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.0 steal. Last season, Lillard racked up six games with at least 40 points, including a 50-point outing, plus 13 games with double-digit assists. Heading into 2019-20, there have been some significant roster changes for Portland. Moving on from Moe Harkless and Al-Farouq Aminu -- both of whom had been racking up minutes on the wing for four years -- the Blazers appear in line to start Kent Bazemore at small forward, while Anthony Tolliver, Zach Collins and Mario Hezonja will presumably split time at power forward. Hassan Whiteside will also start at center while Jusuf Nurkic recovers from a devastating late-season leg injury. While the moves seem lateral, the shake-up has the potential to alter Lillard's stats, though it's unlikely to be dramatic. All things considered, Lillard seems primed for another great season as one of the NBA's top guards.
Lillard is coming off his fourth All-NBA selection, and he posted career highs in field-goal percentage (44.4) and assists per game (6.9). Lillard has been a driving force of Portland's offense essentially since his rookie year, but things really took off once LaMarcus Aldridge left the team ahead of the 2015-16 campaign. Since then, Lillard has averaged 26.2 points, 6.5 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.0 steal. Last season, Lillard racked up six games with at least 40 points, including a 50-point outing, plus 13 games with double-digit assists. Heading into 2019-20, there have been some significant roster changes for Portland. Moving on from Moe Harkless and Al-Farouq Aminu -- both of whom had been racking up minutes on the wing for four years -- the Blazers appear in line to start Kent Bazemore at small forward, while Anthony Tolliver, Zach Collins and Mario Hezonja will presumably split time at power forward. Hassan Whiteside will also start at center while Jusuf Nurkic recovers from a devastating late-season leg injury. While the moves seem lateral, the shake-up has the potential to alter Lillard's stats, though it's unlikely to be dramatic. All things considered, Lillard seems primed for another great season as one of the NBA's top guards.
ATL (G, PG)
G
79
Min
32.0
PTS
22.9
REB
3.8
AST
8.5
STL
1.1
BLK
0.2
3PT
2.9
Expectations are growing for Trae Young and the Hawks heading into the 2019-20 season, as the point guard is coming off a stellar second half of his rookie campaign that made for a competitive Rookie of the Year race down the stretch. In 81 appearances and starts last season, Young averaged 19.1 points, 8.1 assists and 3.7 rebounds, but it's his post-All-Star break numbers that really stand out. In his final 23 games of the regular season, Young averaged 24.7 points, 9.2 assists and 4.7 rebounds across 33.1 minutes per game, and his three-point shooting percentage raised from 31.2 percent to 34.8 percent during that stretch. His 30.8 percent usage rate after the All-Star break would rank in the top 10 among all eligible NBA players. Heading into his sophomore season, Young's usage is not expected to dip. The offense operated at its best with Young as the focal point, and he will now be surrounded by even more young talent with the addition of De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish in the first round of the 2019 draft.
Expectations are growing for Trae Young and the Hawks heading into the 2019-20 season, as the point guard is coming off a stellar second half of his rookie campaign that made for a competitive Rookie of the Year race down the stretch. In 81 appearances and starts last season, Young averaged 19.1 points, 8.1 assists and 3.7 rebounds, but it's his post-All-Star break numbers that really stand out. In his final 23 games of the regular season, Young averaged 24.7 points, 9.2 assists and 4.7 rebounds across 33.1 minutes per game, and his three-point shooting percentage raised from 31.2 percent to 34.8 percent during that stretch. His 30.8 percent usage rate after the All-Star break would rank in the top 10 among all eligible NBA players. Heading into his sophomore season, Young's usage is not expected to dip. The offense operated at its best with Young as the focal point, and he will now be surrounded by even more young talent with the addition of De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish in the first round of the 2019 draft.
DAL (G, PG, SG, SF)
G
76
Min
34.1
PTS
24.0
REB
8.3
AST
6.6
STL
1.3
BLK
0.4
3PT
2.7
The 2018-19 Rookie of the Year, Doncic had one of the best opening campaigns in NBA history. He became the first rookie ever to average at least 20 points, 7 rebounds, 6 assists and 1 steal, and he did it as a 19-year-old. Not only did Doncic record an impressive 21.2 points per game, he did it in unique fashion for a young player, with the only other rookie ever to average at least 2 made threes and 4 made free-throws being Allen Iverson. The Mavericks are already comfortable handing Doncic the keys to the offense, and his all-around skillset makes him a valuable fantasy commodity. He ranked 11th in usage rate (30.5%) last season, and Doncic recorded eight games with at least 30 points, 22 games with at least 10 rebounds, 11 performances with 10-plus assists, and nine outings with greater than three steals. It's difficult to over-emphasize how NBA-ready Doncic looked as a teenager. Heading into his second season, fantasy owners will look for the 6-foot-7 playmaker to increase his efficiency, as he shot a less-than-ideal 42.7 percent from the field, 32.7 percent from deep and 71.3 percent from the charity stripe. If Doncic can bump those percentages up while making small statistical strides elsewhere, he has a strong shot at making the All-Star team in 2019-20 and being a top-tier fantasy asset.
The 2018-19 Rookie of the Year, Doncic had one of the best opening campaigns in NBA history. He became the first rookie ever to average at least 20 points, 7 rebounds, 6 assists and 1 steal, and he did it as a 19-year-old. Not only did Doncic record an impressive 21.2 points per game, he did it in unique fashion for a young player, with the only other rookie ever to average at least 2 made threes and 4 made free-throws being Allen Iverson. The Mavericks are already comfortable handing Doncic the keys to the offense, and his all-around skillset makes him a valuable fantasy commodity. He ranked 11th in usage rate (30.5%) last season, and Doncic recorded eight games with at least 30 points, 22 games with at least 10 rebounds, 11 performances with 10-plus assists, and nine outings with greater than three steals. It's difficult to over-emphasize how NBA-ready Doncic looked as a teenager. Heading into his second season, fantasy owners will look for the 6-foot-7 playmaker to increase his efficiency, as he shot a less-than-ideal 42.7 percent from the field, 32.7 percent from deep and 71.3 percent from the charity stripe. If Doncic can bump those percentages up while making small statistical strides elsewhere, he has a strong shot at making the All-Star team in 2019-20 and being a top-tier fantasy asset.
SAC (G, PG)
G
80
Min
32.7
PTS
19.4
REB
4.2
AST
7.9
STL
1.8
BLK
0.6
3PT
1.4
After an underwhelming first season where he failed to make an All-Rookie team, Fox stepped up as a sophomore in 2018-19. He ranked fourth in total assists (590) and sixth in steals (133) while also averaging 17.3 points and 3.8 rebounds per game. The former fifth overall pick improved his efficiency as well, raising his true shooting percentage from 47.7% to 54.4%. Fox's development helped contribute to a 39-win season for Sacramento, and it was the first time the Kings have reached that many victories since 2005-06. He'll look to continue building on his second season, where he managed to accumulate three 30-point games, 17 games with at least 10 assists, and 19 performances with at least three steals. Already a top contributor in the assists and steals categories, Fox's room to grow is in his scoring. Primarily, increasing his free-throw percentage (72.7%) and finding a way to shoot more threes (1.1 makes per game at 37.1%).
After an underwhelming first season where he failed to make an All-Rookie team, Fox stepped up as a sophomore in 2018-19. He ranked fourth in total assists (590) and sixth in steals (133) while also averaging 17.3 points and 3.8 rebounds per game. The former fifth overall pick improved his efficiency as well, raising his true shooting percentage from 47.7% to 54.4%. Fox's development helped contribute to a 39-win season for Sacramento, and it was the first time the Kings have reached that many victories since 2005-06. He'll look to continue building on his second season, where he managed to accumulate three 30-point games, 17 games with at least 10 assists, and 19 performances with at least three steals. Already a top contributor in the assists and steals categories, Fox's room to grow is in his scoring. Primarily, increasing his free-throw percentage (72.7%) and finding a way to shoot more threes (1.1 makes per game at 37.1%).
DEN (C, C)
G
76
Min
32.2
PTS
21.4
REB
11.1
AST
7.8
STL
1.3
BLK
0.7
3PT
1.3
Jokic's ascent into stardom still feels like it came out of nowhere, and the center finished fourth in MVP voting last season as the Nuggets finished with the best record in the Western Conference. He's already established himself as one of the best passing big men in NBA history, averaging 7.3 dimes per game last season to go along with 20.1 points, 10.8 rebounds and 1.4 steals. Combine that with great shooting percentages for a center (51/31/82), and you have an elite fantasy asset. But at just 24 years old, Jokic has room to grow. And he's one of the few NBA stars not paired up with another star, so his crucial role in the Nuggets' offense is a lock. Jokic doesn't figure to add any groundbreaking skills to his repertoire, but small improvements to each facet of his game will make a big difference. Notably, if he continues working on his strength and conditioning, he could stay out on the court longer and improve as a shot blocker. While taking Jokic with the first pick in a fantasy draft would be considered a reach, he'll likely be long gone by the time pick 10 comes around.
Jokic's ascent into stardom still feels like it came out of nowhere, and the center finished fourth in MVP voting last season as the Nuggets finished with the best record in the Western Conference. He's already established himself as one of the best passing big men in NBA history, averaging 7.3 dimes per game last season to go along with 20.1 points, 10.8 rebounds and 1.4 steals. Combine that with great shooting percentages for a center (51/31/82), and you have an elite fantasy asset. But at just 24 years old, Jokic has room to grow. And he's one of the few NBA stars not paired up with another star, so his crucial role in the Nuggets' offense is a lock. Jokic doesn't figure to add any groundbreaking skills to his repertoire, but small improvements to each facet of his game will make a big difference. Notably, if he continues working on his strength and conditioning, he could stay out on the court longer and improve as a shot blocker. While taking Jokic with the first pick in a fantasy draft would be considered a reach, he'll likely be long gone by the time pick 10 comes around.
PHI (G, PG, PF)
G
80
Min
34.9
PTS
17.9
REB
8.8
AST
7.8
STL
1.5
BLK
0.8
3PT
0.2
Simmons backed up his 2017-18 Rookie of the Year award by making his first All-Star team in 2018-19. As a 6-foot-10 point guard with no shooting ability outside of the paint, he's one of the more unique players we've seen in recent history, and he's one of only 10 players in the three-point era to average at least 16 points, 8 rebounds, 7 assists and 1 steal. Simmons naturally draws comparisons to Magic Johnson -- a tall, distributing point guard with limited shooting touch. That said, it remains to be seen what type of ceiling that type of player has in the modern NBA, where three-point shooting is emphasized. While Simmons didn't demonstrate much improvement from Year 1 to Year 2, he's already one of the best passers in the NBA and a dynamic finisher around the basket and in transition. That gives him a high floor moving forward, even if the fit between him and Joel Embiid is less than ideal. Heading into 2019-20, fantasy owners should not expect Simmons to develop a passable jumper (he was 2-for-25 from beyond 15 feet last season), but rather view that possibility as a bonus.
Simmons backed up his 2017-18 Rookie of the Year award by making his first All-Star team in 2018-19. As a 6-foot-10 point guard with no shooting ability outside of the paint, he's one of the more unique players we've seen in recent history, and he's one of only 10 players in the three-point era to average at least 16 points, 8 rebounds, 7 assists and 1 steal. Simmons naturally draws comparisons to Magic Johnson -- a tall, distributing point guard with limited shooting touch. That said, it remains to be seen what type of ceiling that type of player has in the modern NBA, where three-point shooting is emphasized. While Simmons didn't demonstrate much improvement from Year 1 to Year 2, he's already one of the best passers in the NBA and a dynamic finisher around the basket and in transition. That gives him a high floor moving forward, even if the fit between him and Joel Embiid is less than ideal. Heading into 2019-20, fantasy owners should not expect Simmons to develop a passable jumper (he was 2-for-25 from beyond 15 feet last season), but rather view that possibility as a bonus.
NOR (G, PG, SG)
G
73
Min
35.4
PTS
21.3
REB
5.3
AST
7.1
STL
1.6
BLK
0.8
3PT
1.9
Holiday is coming off one of the most productive seasons of his career. He set career highs in points (21.2), free-throws made (3.1), threes made (1.8), rebounds (5.0) and steals (1.6) per game. His average of 7.7 assists also ranked fifth in the league. Holiday had several big games as well, racking up 18 double-doubles, five outings with 30-plus points, 15 outings with at least 10 assists, and 18 games with more than two steals. The biggest knock on Holiday continues to be his injury history. Since 2012-13, the guard is averaging only 61.7 appearances per season. This year, with Anthony Davis being dealt to the Lakers, Holiday should have an opportunity to see his usage increase. While the Pelicans added the likes of Lonzo Ball, Brandon Ingram and Zion Williamson -- all capable of taking touches away from Holiday -- the veteran should be the primary ballhandler for a team looking to remain competitive. Heading into his age 29 season, it's unlikely we see a massive leap forward from Holiday, but he'll be in a strong position to remain productive on the new-look Pelicans.
Holiday is coming off one of the most productive seasons of his career. He set career highs in points (21.2), free-throws made (3.1), threes made (1.8), rebounds (5.0) and steals (1.6) per game. His average of 7.7 assists also ranked fifth in the league. Holiday had several big games as well, racking up 18 double-doubles, five outings with 30-plus points, 15 outings with at least 10 assists, and 18 games with more than two steals. The biggest knock on Holiday continues to be his injury history. Since 2012-13, the guard is averaging only 61.7 appearances per season. This year, with Anthony Davis being dealt to the Lakers, Holiday should have an opportunity to see his usage increase. While the Pelicans added the likes of Lonzo Ball, Brandon Ingram and Zion Williamson -- all capable of taking touches away from Holiday -- the veteran should be the primary ballhandler for a team looking to remain competitive. Heading into his age 29 season, it's unlikely we see a massive leap forward from Holiday, but he'll be in a strong position to remain productive on the new-look Pelicans.
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